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Derivatives of rational powers of x
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Derivatives of rational powers of x

From the following equation, we show that the formula is valid for all integer values ​​of n and for n =. We will now use implicit differentiation to show that this formula is valid for any rational exponent. More precisely, we will show that if r is a rational number, then whenever and are defined.

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André Marie Ampère

André Marie Ampère was a French mathematician and physicist. He was born in 1775 and died in 1836. His life was marked by a great brightness in the field of knowledge. At age 12, I was already familiar with advanced mathematics. He would, however, have great family troubles: at the age of eighteen during the French Revolution his father was guillotined during a riot in the city of Lyon; under 30, he lost his wife, whom he had recently married.
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2 + 2 + 2 = 4?

We start from the following idea of ​​counting, where the sets are determined by the ellipses and the units by the "x". Since each set has 2 units, we have 2 + 2 = 4 units. Now note the figure below: Note that in this figure only one set has been added, so there is no addition of units.
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4 is greater than 5?

Let's check: We start with the following inequality: (1/81)> (1/243) That is: (1/3) 4> (1/3) 5 Applying the two-sided decimal logarithm we get: log 10 (1 / 3) 4> log 10 (1/3) 5 Applying the power property of the logarithms we have: 4 log 10 (1/3)> 5 log 10 (1/3) Dividing both sides by log 10 (1/3) We came to the conclusion: 4> 5 Obviously this demonstration has an error, because we all know that 4 is not greater than 5 (or does anyone have any questions?
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George berkeley

George Berkeley (1685-1753) was an Irish Idealist philosopher. Best known for his advocacy of immaterialism, he went from epistemological studies to develop analysis of metaphysical themes, philosophy of science, philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of religion, economics, politics, and morals. He also believed that the foundations of mathematics cannot be understood, just as we cannot understand the foundations of faith, and if we believe in mathematics, the greater belief we should have in religious truths.
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Mathematics: the teaching-learning process

Clarice Lúcia Schneider The content of this work was developed by the academic Clarice Lúcia Schneider of the course Pedagogy modality Degree for the Early Years of the Open Core and Distance Education of the Institute of Education of the Federal University of Mato Grosso, to complete the area of ​​Mathematics .
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Aristotle

Aristotle was born in Estagira, a city of Macedonia, about 320 kilometers north of Athens in 384 BC and died in 322 BC. He was a mathematician, writer, philosopher, and biologist. Author of the oldest set of scientific works that physically resisted to our time and also considered the most learned man of all time.
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Toy Rescue from an Ethnomathematics Perspective

Estélen Wolff Freitas Juatificative and theoretical contributions My pedagogical practice is centered on the importance of playing, seeking to rescue the values ​​of toys and games that parents / grandparents of students experienced in the past. I think this theme is directly linked to the reality in which my students are experiencing at this time.
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Mathematics and the new high school

Marcelo Lellis Luiz Márcio Imenes This article aims to contribute to the discussion on the teaching of mathematics in high school, considering the recent National Curriculum Parameters for this level of education. The text comprises three cores: notes on the changes that have been proposed about Brazilian education; considerations about the current teaching of mathematics in high school (high school or high school, as it was called until recently); a suggestion of priority contents and appropriate approaches for a new teaching of Mathematics.
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Jacques Bernoulli

Jacques Bernoulli (or Jakob Bernoulli) was a Swiss mathematician. He and his brother Jean Bernoulli were disciples of Leibniz. No family in human history has produced as many mathematicians as the Bernoulli family, twelve in all, who have contributed unparalleled in the creation and development of differential and integral calculus.
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Bernhard Bolzano

Bernhard Bolzano was born and died in Prague, Czechoslovakia. Although he was a priest, he had ideas contrary to those of the Church. His mathematical discoveries were very little recognized by his contemporaries. In 1817 published the book "Rein Analytisches Beweis" (purely analytical proof), proving by arithmetic methods the algebra location theorem, requiring for this a non-geometric concept of continuity of a curve or function.
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Francesco Bonaventura Cavalieri

Francesco Bonaventura Cavalieri was an Italian mathematician and astronomer, born in 1598 in the city of Milan. He is known primarily for the Cavalieri Principle, which assists in the calculation of solids volumes. Professor at the University of Bologna, invented the method of indivisibles (1635), ushering in a new era for geometry and paving the way for the introduction of integral calculus.
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Christian Huygens

Christian Huygens was a Dutch mathematician, physicist and astronomer, born in The Hague, The Netherlands, on April 14, 1629. He was the second of four children of the poet and diplomat Constantijn Huygens (1596-1687). He was a man of wide culture who also devoted himself to the sciences. From his father, Huygens received his first instruction in mathematics and mechanics at the age of thirteen, and from early on aroused interest and skill in both.
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Charles-Julien Brianchon

Charles-Julien Brianchon, a French mathematician mathematician, was born in Sevres (France) in 1783 and died in Versailles (France) in 1864. He published the well-known Brianchon theorem in the Journal de l'E.P (1806). He entered the Polytechnique School of Paris (1804), where he was a student of Monk. His first paper was Sur les surfaces courbes du second degré in the Journal of l'Ecole Polytechnique, while still a student, on Pascal's magical hexagon.
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Christian Doppler

Christian Johann Doppler was an Austrian mathematician, born in 1803 in Salzburg, and died in Venice in 1853. He became famous for discovering the physical phenomenon called the Doppler effect. Educated at the Vienna Polytechnic Institute, he later became director of the Institute of Physics and professor of Experimental Physics at the University of Vienna.
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Hippark

Hiparchus, in Greek Hipparkhos, century astronomer and mathematician. II BC, was born in Nicaea, Bithynia. He lived in Alexandria, but worked mainly in Rhodes, from 161 to 126 BC. D staked by the method and rigor of his observations. He created technically perfected instruments that allowed him to draw up a catalog of approximately eighty stars.
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Cnido Eudox

The Greek Eudoxus (408 BC - 355 BC) of Cnidus was the inventor of the celestial spheres and one of the first to describe the movement of the planets. There is little information available about it. He is known to have been in the city of Tarento, Italy, to study with a disciple of Pythagoras named Arquitas.
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Euclid

In very ancient times, a young man, deciding to be witty, asked his teacher what profit could come from studying geometry. Unfortunate idea: the master was the great Greek mathematician Euclid, for whom geometry was very serious. And his response to boldness was overwhelming: calling a slave, he handed him some coins and ordered them to be handed over to the pupil who from that moment ceased to be Euclid's pupil.
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Élie Cartan

ÉLie Joseph Cartan was a French mathematician who was born on April 9, 1869 in Dolomieu. He was the father of mathematician Henri Cartan. He studied at the Paris Higher Normal School in 1888. After his doctorate in 1894, he worked in Montpellier and Lyon, becoming a professor at the University of Nancy in 1903.
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Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier

Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier, born March 21, 1768, and died May 16, 1830. He was a French mathematician known primarily for his contribution to the mathematical analysis of heat flow. Trained for the priesthood, Fourier did not make his vows. Instead, he headed toward mathematics.
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Marie Litzinger

Marie Litzinger was born May 14, 1899 and died April 7, 1952. She received her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1920 and her Master of Arts degree in 1922 from Bryn Mawr College. He taught at Devon Manor School while working on his master's degree. She was awarded the European Society Bryn Mawr after her graduation in 1920, which she used to study at the University of Rome during 1923-24.
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