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1st degree function

Definition The 1st degree polynomial function, or related function, is any function f from IR to IR given by a law of the form f (x) = ax + b, where a and b are given real numbers and a 0. In function f (x) = ax + b, the number a is called the coefficient of x, and the number b is called the constant term. Here are some examples of 1st degree polynomial functions: f (x) = 5 x - 3, where a = 5 and b = - 3 f (x) = -2 x - 7, where a = -2 and b = - 7 f ( x) = 11 x, where a = 11 and b = 0 Graph The graph of a polynomial function of the first degree, y = ax + b, with a 0, is an oblique line to the axes O x and O y.
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Cosine - Origin of the word

While sine (read the story of the word sine) was named after mathematicians who wrote in Arabic, the name of cosine was coined by Europeans who wrote in Latin. From the history of sine, it is clear that the name sinus was not the most appropriate to represent this mathematical concept. However, as it was used by most mathematicians of the time, the cosine was eventually based on it as well, as there was a need to express the "complement" of sine.
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Pascal's Triangle

The ordered arrangement of binomial numbers, as in the table below, is called Pascal Triangle. In this triangular table, binomial numbers with the same numerator are written on the same row and those of the same denominator in the same column. For example, binomial numbers,, and are in row 3 and binomial numbers,,,,…,,… are in column 1.
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Abraham of Moivre

Abraham de Moivre was born on May 26, 1667 in Vitry (near Paris), France, and died on November 27, 1754 in London, England. After spending five years in a Protestant academy in Sedan, Moivre studied logic in Saumur from 1682 until 1684. He then went to Paris, studying at the Collège de Harcourt, and taking private math classes with Ozanam.
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Who discovered the Pythagorean Theorem?

Western mathematical tradition has long attributed the discovery of this theorem to Pythagoras. More recent historical research has found that the theorem was known to the Babylonians, circa 1500 BC, so long before Pythagoras. The Chinese knew him perhaps around 1100 a.
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Challenge Response 27

What is the division quotient? Carrying out the division we have: Back to the statement Challenge 26 Bricks in the truck Challenge index Next >> Challenge 28 Possible values ​​for x?
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